Item Conversions (Vol 2): Rings from Origins

Rings from Dragon Age Origins are converted for your use in the RPG!

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A little lyrium on a simple gold band around the finger can sometimes make all the difference.

Empress Celene kept a magical ring that protected her from an ambush by creating burning wounds on those she touched. Some rings have been passed through many hands, both heroic and otherwise, and many cultures give rings as part of rites of passage or age. Mages have the most use for rings, as many of them boost magical powers, but warriors and rogues have a few choice rings they may wish to snag when the chance arises. The influence of these rings isn’t always obvious, but they can give the heroes that last push they might need!

Below is a collection of rings that have been converted/inspired by the rings in Dragon Age: Origins. This list in not exhaustive, but feel free to use them as you see fit or adjust them as you need them! The levels listed next to the item suggest a recommended level the PCs be before they find an item of this nature.

As a general rule that is upheld by the video games, a character can only gain the magical benefits of two rings at once, but the RPG currently has no rules for permanent magic item limits so feel free to adjust this!

Ash (Ring, Level 10; 15 with set)

This potent magical ring feels blisteringly hot in the outside of the band, but the inside seems cool like river water. This ring is bursting with power, and the wearer may use the Fast Casting stunt for 3 SP instead of the usual 4 when casting fire and lightning-based spells. When worn with Icicle on the other hand, the wearer becomes a true force of primal magic, treating their Magic as 3 higher when using Primal spells.

 Band of Fire (Ring, Level 10)

These rings are forged with great care by the Formari in the Circle of Magi. Powerful flames are bound into the ring, often causing accidents of lost eye brows or hair during their creation. Some say this is why the Formari often shave their heads… Wearing the ring ensures that the wearer is protected from fire, granting the wearer not only a +2 bonus on tests to resist fire-based effects, but increases the wearer’s Armor Rating by 3 against these effects. Versions of this ring that protect against other elements exist, most notably the Band of Ice and the Band of Lightning.

Blessing of the Divine (Ring, Level 10; 15 with set)

These rings were given by Divine Justinia II to Templars and Seekers who performed with distinction. Ironically enchanted to improve a Templar’s abilities, some members of the Templar Order argued that they didn’t need more magic to fight against magic. Regardless, the rings were potent and saw great use among the Chantry’s best hunters of maleficarum. A Templar with this ring increases the range of their Master degree anti-magic burst to 10 yards, and they no longer take the -2 penalty to Defense when using it. This ring and the Mark of the Divine rings usually come in sets. When worn together, a Templar also gains a +4 bonus to Armor Rating against spells and magical attacks.

Blood Ring (Ring, Level 10)

Dragon carvings encircle the ring’s face, and the wearer swears that someone is whispering nearby, but not close enough to understand. This fell ring improves the efficiency of blood magic. Blood Mages who wear this ring may choose to increase the penetrating damage taken by a target (themselves, allies, or enemies as is appropriate for talent level) by at most 3 points, increasing the Mana gained from the blood taken by the same number. You always take 3 less damage from the bloodletting, but your allies are not so protected unless they have one of these rings as well. If the target is helpless, as per the conditions of the Master degree of the Blood Mage talent, you can deal at most 6 extra points of penetrating damage for the same amount of extra Mana. These rings are often recognized by Templars as dangerous artifacts, and may draw unwanted attention if the ring is not concealed.

Dalish Battery (Ring, Level 10)

The Dalish have great respect for nature, and they understand its power well as seen in this ring. The spiraling band of lyrium on this ring seems to draw power from the air, and sizzles when a storm is overhead. This potent ring makes lightning-based spells strike harder and faster, allowing the wearer to perform the Mighty Spell stunt for 1 SP instead of the usual 2 when they cast a spell with shocking effects. If this ring is worn with Twitch on the other hand, the wearer crackles with electricity while under stress. The bonuses to damage that Twitch grants to electricity-based spells and effects doubles while the Dalish Battery is also worn.

Dalish Promise Ring (Ring, Level 5)

These enchanted silver rings are typically crafted by Dalish Keepers to protect a married couple so they may live long and healthy lives together. The rings protection is potent, as the wearer gains +1d6 Health when healing is received from a spell, a potion, or rest.

Dreamsever (Ring, Level 10)

An old ring from the time of the Third Blight, this ring creates strange ripples in the Veil when used to remove magical effects, making the world seem more real. The wearer gains a +3 bonus on Magic (Spirit) tests to dispel magic when casting spells like Dispel Magic or Anti-Magic Burst. Consequentially, the strange, silencing energies in the ring also grant a +2 bonus to others attempting to dispel magical effects that are affecting the wearer specifically (not area of effect effects that the wearer happens to be within). How this ring might work in the Fade has never been tested, but few think it wise to ope the Veil to try anyway…

Earthbound (Ring, Level 15)

A ring of gold with geometric veins of lyrium inset into it, this ring was one of a set created by an ambitious Archon of Tevinter named Lovias. Through these rings he sought to control the physical world and the Fade, with one in each hand. The rings did no such thing, but were still quite potent. The wearer of Earthbound may use Fast Casting stunt for 3 SP instead of the usual 4 when casting Primal spells. When both this ring and Soulbound are worn together, the wearer gains a +2 bonus to Spellpower.

Ember (Ring, Level 5)

This ring is warm to the touch, warm enough that most bearers begin to worry it will burn them eventually. It never seems to cool, but has also never burned anyone (as far as we know). Focusing the primal energies of fire, this ring grants the wearer’s fire-based spells a +1 bonus to damage for each d6 of damage rolled (this bonus also works with stunts like Mighty Spell or Lethal Spell). This bonus also applies for bearers whose weapons deal fire damage from the Flaming Weapons spell, and it doubles the bonus fire damage from an Elemental Rune of Fire.

Focus Ring (Ring, Level 5)

Made of three loops of intertwined silver, gold, and copper, this ring has a deceptively strong connection to the Fade. The ring sharpens the wearer’s connection to the Fade and any Spirit spells they cast that deal damage gain a +1 bonus to damage for each d6 of damage rolled (this bonus also works with stunts like Mighty Spell or Lethal Spell).

Frostshear (Ring, Level 10)

Blue icicles seem to float about the hand that this ring is worn on, and a palpable aura of cold can be felt when brought close. This potent ring makes ice-based spells freeze harder and faster, allowing the wearer to perform the Mighty Spell stunt for 1 SP instead of the usual 2 when they cast a spell with icy effects. If this ring is worn with an Iced Band on the other hand, the wearer seems to be covered in a rime of azure frost. The bonuses to damage that an Iced Band grants to ice-based spells and effects doubles while Frostshear is also worn.

Golden Ring (Ring, Level 5)

The geometric patterns on this golden ring mark it as dwarven-made. The gold seems to have an odd green sheen, suggesting gold is not the only substance used to make it. The wearer is granted a +2 bonus to Constitution (Stamina) and Constitution (Drinking) tests. Dwarven enchanters will likely not allow you to enter contests of drink while wearing this ring.

Harvest Festival Ring (Ring, Level 10)

A cunningly simple ring, this wooden band has designs of vines and pumpkins on it. When mages live among small communities away from the Chantry, usually in times of merriment, they will craft rings like these as prizes for friendly village competitions. More potent than most of the competition winners realize, this ring bestow its wearer with a champion’s charisma, allowing the wearer to perform the Jest stunt for 2 SP instead of the usual 3, and the Flirt stunt for 3 SP instead of the usual 4. Subjects affected by these stunts may take a -1 penalty to tests to resist the wearer’s charms, if the GM deems it appropriate.

Iced Band (Ring, Level 5)

This lyrium encircled ring has a perpetual coating of frost on its face. Focusing the primal energies of ice, this ring grants the wearer’s ice-based spells a +1 bonus to damage for each d6 of damage rolled (this bonus also works with stunts like Mighty Spell or Lethal Spell). This bonus also applies for bearers whose weapons deal ice damage from the Frost Weapons spell (increasing the total damage bonus to +3), and it doubles the bonus ice damage from an Elemental Rune of Ice.

Icicle (Ring, Level 10; 15 with set)

This ring is numbingly cold on the outside of the band, but the inside feels warm. This ring is bursting with power, and the wearer may use the Fast Casting stunt for 3 SP instead of the usual 4 when casting ice and earth-based spells. When worn with Ash on the other hand, the wearer becomes a true force of primal magic, treating their Magic as 3 higher when using Primal spells.

Imperial Ring Set (Rings, Level 10; 15 if together)

Supposedly, these two rings were gifted to Darinius from Endrin Stonehammer in the early days of the Imperium, to signify the bond between the Tevinter Imperium and the dwarves. Darinius wore them until his death, and then they were both lost in the squabbling for his throne. The first ring, Dawn, was made from a single perfect topaz and feels like it has bee left in the sun. The second ring, Dusk, was made from a flawless amethyst and feels cool in the hand like a night breeze. These rings are part of a set. The wearer of Dawn treats their Strength as 2 higher and their Cunning and 1 lower while the ring is worn. The wearer of Dusk treats their Cunning as 2 higher and their Strength as 1 lower while the ring is worn. If both rings are worn, the wearer treats their Armor Rating as 2 higher, in addition to the benefits from both rings (evening out to +1 Cunning and +1 Strength)

Keeper’s Ring (Ring, Level 10)

A simple band of willow wrapped around the finger, playful halla and other woodland creatures seem to dance in the wood grain. Often granted to new Keepers after the passing of the originals, these rings grant their wearers a +3 bonus on Magic tests to activate spells that have the Keeper specialization as a requirement (or that requires another spell that does in the case of Stone’s Throw). Additionally, the spell Wrath of the Elven now deals your Magic in penetrating damage to those who fail a Constitution (Stamina) test to resist it, and half your Magic in penetrating damage to those who succeed the test to resist it.

Lifegiver (Ring, Level 15)

This ring was crafted by a powerful blood mage, but its powers have protected many a hero or noble over the centuries of its existence. Some say that its powers are not free, and the ring exacts a price for its protection, but none can say what that price is. This powerful ring protects the life of the wearer, increasing its Armor Rating by 2, and granting the wearer additional Health from spells and other healing effects equal to the wearer’s Constitution (even if the wearer’s Constitution is already added to the healing received, such as with potions or rest). Finally, the wearer’s Constitution is treated as 2 higher while the ring is worn.

The Lucky Stone (Ring, Level 10)

Some say this ring has a life of its own, desiring adventures while on the hands of heroes. When grand quests end, the ring disappears, supposedly to seek new challenges. The wearer of this ring fund that luck often turns their way when they most need it to. Wearers of this ring once per day may increase or decrease the result of a Dragon Die by up to 3.

Mark of the Divine (Ring, Level 10; 15 with set)

These rings were given by Divine Justinia II to Templars and Seekers who performed with distinction. Ironically enchanted to improve a Templar’s abilities, some members of the Templar Order argued that they didn’t need more magic to fight against magic. Regardless, the rings were potent and saw great use among the Chantry’s best hunters of maleficarum. A Templar with the Journeyman degree of the specialization talent drains an extra 1d6 Mana from its targets while wearing this ring. This ring and the Blessing of the Divine rings usually come in sets. When worn together, a Templar also gains a +4 bonus to Armor Rating against spells and magical attacks.

Ring of Ages (Ring, Level 15)

Some claim that this ring is one of the oldest magical item in Thedas, even going so far as to suggest that magic was still new to the elves when this ring was crafted. While this is likely an exaggeration, the ring still feels impossibly ancient and powerful. The wearer always benefits from half of their Armor Rating, even against penetrating damage. A wearer with the Master degree of the Armor Training talent always uses 3/4ths their Armor Rating against damage, penetrating or not.

Ring of Faith (Ring, Level 10)

This band of ivory has designs that almost seem primitive on its face. Rays of warm sunlight encircle the ring, and it seems to keep the bearer warm. This potent ring makes fire-based spells burn harder and faster, allowing the wearer to perform the Mighty Spell stunt for 1 SP instead of the usual 2 when they cast a spell with fiery effects. If this ring is worn with an Ember on the other hand, the wearer seems to be surrounded by an aura of flame and smoke. The bonuses to damage that an Ember grants to fire-based spells and effects doubles while the Ring of Faith is also worn.

Ring of Discipline (Ring, Level 10; 15 with set)

An engraving in ancient Tevene encircles this bloodstone ring: “A master without discipline is no master at all.” The wearer treats their Willpower as 2 higher, and their Cunning as 1 lower. When worn with a Ring of Mastery, the wearer also treats their Magic as 1 higher.

Ring of Mastery (Ring, Level 10; 15 with set)

An engraving in ancient Tevene encircles this dawnstone ring: “What use is discipline with a lack of skill?” The wearer treats their Cunning as 2 higher, and their Willpower as 1 lower. When worn with a Ring of Mastery, the wearer also treats their Magic as 1 higher.

Ring of Resistance (Ring, Level 10)

A strange shimmer dances across this iron band when it is held in the light. The wearer gains a +1 bonus to tests performed as a reaction to defend the wearer against something (such as spells, hazards, traps, or some special attacks of adversaries at the GM’s discretion).

Ring of Severity (Ring, Level 10; 15 with set)

In Antivan writing, the engraving inside of this steel ring reads “not all men are subtle.” The wearer of this ring feels like they can take on the world, and treats their Strength as 2 higher, and their Dexterity as 1 lower. When worn with the Ring of Subtlety, the wearer also treats their Constitution as 1 higher.

Ring of Study (Ring, Level 5)

These silver rings are one of the handful of gifts given to apprentice mages who pass their Harrowing and become full-fledged members of the Circle of Magi. The ring grants a +1 bonus on Magic tests to cast spells while the ring is worn.

Ring of Subtlety (Ring, Level 10; 15 with set)

In Antivan writing, the engraving inside of this steel ring reads “not all men are severe.” The wearer of this ring feels like they can take on the world, and treats their Dexterity as 2 higher, and their Strength as 1 lower. When worn with the Ring of Severity, the wearer also treats their Constitution as 1 higher.

Ring of the Warrior (Ring, Level 5)

Despite the name, Warriors and Rogues would find this steel ring useful. The wearer gains a +1 bonus on all weapon damage rolls while the ring is worn.

Seal of Rat Red (Ring, Level 5)

When Orlais conquered Ferelden, a folk hero by the name of Rat Red appeared and vexed the occupying forces endlessly with simple pranks against high-ranking soldiers and the sabotage of wagons and weapons. They were impossible to kill by the Orlesian’s perception, because the hero was actually a title passed between multiple people who took up the mantle when the current hero could no longer fight. The wearer of this signet ring, which bears the symbol of a smiling rat, may once per day choose to reroll a single ability test made to resist mental or physical harm. The results of the second test are final.

Silverleaf (Ring, Level 10)

A wooden ring with a sheen like silver, this ring appears like a leaf that has curled around the wearer’s finger. Often worn by experienced Keepers, the rings seem to whisper the answers to questions they hear, if the bearers listen closely. The wearer gains a +2 bonus on Cunning tests involving lore (such as Arcane Lore, Cultural Lore, or Historical Lore).

Soulbound (Ring, Level 15)

A ring of silverite with geometric veins of lyrium inset into it, this ring was one of a set created by an ambitious Archon of Tevinter named Lovias. Through these rings he sought to control the physical world and the Fade, with one in each hand. The rings did no such thing, but were still quite potent. The wearer of Soulbound may use Fast Casting stunt for 3 SP instead of the usual 4 when casting Spirit spells. When both this ring and Earthbound are worn together, the wearer gains a +2 bonus to Spellpower.

Surveyor (Ring, Level 5)

This copper ring is inset with several stones that only slightly resemble opals. Some people swear that the opals blink. The wearer gains a +1 bonus on Perception (Searching and Seeing) tests

Twitch (Ring, Level 5)

This ring seems to smell ozone, and the hand it is placed on spasms on occasion. Focusing the primal energies of lightning, this ring grants the wearer’s electricity-based spells a +1 bonus to damage for each d6 of damage rolled (this bonus also works with stunts like Mighty Spell or Lethal Spell). This ring also doubles the bonus electricity damage from an Elemental Rune of Lightning.

The Wicked Oath (Ring, Level 10)

The worrying legend of this ring is a tale of blood magic, a trapped Antivan countess, and the murder of her husband to secure her flight from his clutches. This ring is a boon to any who wishes to make a quick kill, but can shine brightest in the hands of a Rogue (particularly skilled Assassins). The ring grants a +2 bonus on damage rolls that are modified by class powers or stunts that add dice to a damage roll. For each extra die rolled (from powers like Backstab, Bluff, or Mighty Blow), that damage roll gains a cumulative +2 bonus. For example, a Rogue who backstabs and gets a Mighty Blow stunt would add 2d6 to their damage roll from the power and stunt, so the damage bonus from this ring would be +4. Flaming Weapons does not get a bonus from this ring.

Episode 14: Getting in the Spirit

Welcome to the Wonders of Thedas Podcast, your one-stop-shop for all your Dragon Age roleplaying needs!

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We reach out across the Veil in this positively spiritual episode! We have a roleplaying question and a collection of creations from the Green Ronin forums to share! We know our demons and spirits, and we know that those beyond the Veil hope you’ll enjoy this episode!

If you’d like to see the NPC collections from Alurelve and Icarus you can click here and click here, respectively!

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Item Conversions for the Dragon Age RPG (Vol. 1)

The Dragon Age RPG is lucky in that it has a wealth of inspiration from the video games for new adventures, characters, locations, and items. Like most IPs that have an RPG attached to them, it can be tempting to ask “what would this look like in the RPG?” With this collection, which will not be only of its kind, we’ll take a look at the items from the video games and convert them for the RPG!

These are fan-made (by us here on the podcast) and totally optional. These are only our interpretations of how the item could appear in the RPG, and not a perfect conversion. We will also include an “item level” for these items. This is the level that it would be recommended for your PCs to be at minimum before finding an item like this.

We hope you like these! If you have a special request to see a specific item in the RPG feel free to let us know, or if you’ve got your own feel free to share with us!

Dalish Armor (Light Leather Armor, Level 2)

Masterwork: Armor Rating 4

Lovingly crafted by Dalish leather workers, this suit is constructed out of deerskin with images of birds and serpents hunting prey. The set, including boots and gloves, feels much lighter than it appears, and grants its bearer a +2 bonus to speed when moving through wooded areas.

Ring of Unheeded Wisdom (Ring, Level 6)

This dented steel ring seems to have been through many trials and in the hands of many owners. Bearers of the ring have reported strange voices telling them to “watch out” or “duck” when a potentially lethal force was headed their way, but most see it as paranoia of the wielders, most of whom are dangerous sellswords and criminals anyway. The bearer of the ring gains a +1 bonus on Perception tests to avoid being surprised when combat encounters begin, and a +1 on tests to resist and avoid the effects of traps.

Mark of Vigilance (Amulet, Level 10)

This potent magical amulet is a badge of honor among Templars and other mage-hunters. Granted by the Divine herself for exceptional service to the cause of policing forbidden arts, this amulet protects the wearer against harmful magics. The bearer gains Magic Resistance, a +2 bonus on tests to resist spells and other magical effects. If the bearer already has that ability from a talent or background (or both), their bonus increases by +1. Additionally, the bearer gains a +2 to Armor Rating against the attack of creatures with Mana scores or magical abilities, like the powers of most demons.

Evanura (Bastard Sword, Level 14)

Material: Steel
Masterwork: +2 Attack, +2 Damage
Talent Levels: Two
Focus Benefit: Yes
Runes: Master Frost Rune

Forged by the high priest of June when the Dales belonged to the elves, this mighty blade has been wielded by the greatest of the Emerald Knights from its beginnings to its end in the Exalted March against the Dales. A powerful relic from the time of the Dales, any Dalish would be elevated to legendary status for recovering it. It is said that its blade is so sharp that it cuts Veil when swung. Thankfully it does not, but the blade ignores 3 points of Armor when striking a foe.

The Creationist’s Cord (Belt, Level 16)

A mighty tool of Creation magic specialists, this unassuming length of silk cord woven with lyrium threads is tied in dazzling knots and shapes. Often gifted to powerful healers for acts of extraordinary kindness or dedication in times of trouble, this powerful enchanted cord allows a mage to add their Magic to the damage healed when they cast spells that heal damage to Health. The cord also acts as a mighty conduit for new life to flow from the Fade, and  allows a mage to double the Mana cost of a healing spell to add twice their Magic to the damage healed, or triple the spell’s original Mana cost to add thrice their Magic score to the damage healed.

Episode 13: Throw the Dragon at Them!

Welcome to the Wonders of Thedas Podcast, your one-stop-shop for all your Dragon Age roleplaying game needs!

You can listen to this episode above, on our Soundcloud, or download it from iTunes or Google Play!

In this not-so-complicated episode we discuss some philosophies of designing encounters for the Dragon Age RPG! We answer a meaty listener question, discuss a homemade adventure, and talk about our cats. There are no adversaries stopping you from enjoying this objective! Thank you for listening and safe travels this holiday season!

You can find part one of Joe Nolan’s adventure, Lair of the Seeress, here!

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Episode 12: Down Here With the Nugs

Welcome to the Wonders of Thedas Podcast, your one-stop-shop for all your Dragon Age RPG needs! You can listen to the episode above, or you can download the episode from iTunes or Google Play!

In this sickening episode (perhaps from the poor living conditions of Dust Town) we discuss the Dwarf Duster background! Learn what it’s like to be on the bottom of Orzammar as a casteless dwarf!

We answer a mountain of listener questions and talk about a stellar blog for Dragon Age players who want to get farther into sensitive roleplaying! You can check out Kismet Rose’s Dragon Age here!

We are not impoverished for topics on this slightly dusty episode of the Wonders of Thedas! Thanks for listening!

If you like the podcast you can follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Tumblr, or Soundcloud! If you have any questions, custom content, or anything else you’d like to share with us, please send it through our social media, in an email to wondersofthedaspodcast@gmail.com, or send it in a personal message to Kot the Protector on the Green Ronin forums!

Horror in Thedas

It’s that ghoulish time of year. The Veil is thin this night, and demons and more playful spirits are likely to cross over. Bring your warding salts and your faith, because the monsters under your bed may be more real than you think…

Some groups like to get into the spirit of the seasons when they run their games, and why not? Running a game with a spookier tone when Halloween rolls around is a blast when the campaign has a good moment for it. Some GMs even engineer the pace of their games to make sure that certain game nights on certain holidays have themes tailored to the season!

We probably could have rolled this kind of blog post out sooner in retrospect, but better late than never, right?

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GET ON WITH IT, MORTAL

Thedas already has quite a few inspirations for horror games, so getting some dread into Dragon Age is not so hard. Below we have a few examples of possible routes to horror in Dragon Age’s twisted dark corners…

The Blighted

Dragon Age: Origins really played up the Blight well, what with it being the central conflict for the game. The slavering hordes of bloodthirsty monsters can be quite terrifying on a global scale, let alone as a cross-cultural bogeyman.

However, the Blight can be much more than an apocalyptic fate to be stopped for the good of Thedas. While the video games have you fighting the Blight as Grey Wardens, there are plenty of normal people who are not suited to fighting darkspawn. The average person has little they can do when a darkspawn begins to stalk them in the night. Unfortunate youngsters sneaking out of town for a romantic tryst, brave kids on a dare to explore the cave near the road, or even laborers in a mine that is dangerously close to darkspawn-infested Deep Roads are all possible victims of blighted. Your heroes come in when the town asks them to find their missing loved ones.

The PCs may expect that they were kidnapped by bandits, got horribly lost, or maybe don’t want to be found. The GM should try and make it seem like a standard mission, maybe even play up some spooky ambiance with rumors of giant spider nests, serial killers, or demon influences from the Fade. Let the PCs feel like they can gear up for burning down spider webs or grab some warding salts to protect their camp sites from demon attacks.

They enter the caverns and find they go much deeper than expected. They find strange organic sacks growing on the stone walls, and a cloying sense that something is following them in the dark.

Only to find that they face something relentless and implacable like these:

ogre
He’s so ogre this…

Darkspawn are an excellent bogeyman and work really well when they ate a surprise. While one genlock may not seem terribly exciting a foe, remember that Darkspawn have a hive mind. When one shouts for blood, the others come running, saliva dripping from their diseased mouths. Grey Wardens with experience in the Deep Roads when the darkspawn are alerted to intruders liken the caves into a angry beehive. Darkspawn surge from every shadow, jagged blades held high, mad with glee that with a lucky swing or a single trip from their quarry and they could take even one person with them to meet the Maker.

Ogres make excellent slasher-movie-style monsters. Their incredible strength and devastating attacks when they can grab a foe means your PCs will fight hard not to get caught by these brutes. Shrieks are killers in the shadows, and can help GMs populate every shadows with sticky-bladed murderers to terrorize PCs. Every broken twig, heavy breath, or glint in the moonlight could be a shriek, so your PCs better make that Perception test. Genlocks and Hurlocks can serve as endless foes who seek to run the men through with blades and drag women unfortunate enough to survive the encounter to the greatest horror the darkspawn can bring: that you will birth more of them.

Demons

Demons are the creatures we know that lurk inside us all. It has been said that demons are only as dangerous as what you bring with you. They are drawn to the parts of humanity that intrigue them the most and are changed by them. A great horror scenario could evolve out of a small rural town with a lot of hate in it. Perhaps it’s racial discrimination, or a young mage who gets picked on one too many times, or old bitter rivals who draw demons with their desires for revenge.

Demons are drawn to the darkness of sentient minds, and Thedas has quite a bit of darkness to find. This means that while demons may have trouble crossing over the Veil, they can still be heard from the other side. A pride demon who urges the vengeful mage to show the others who is truly the mightiest; a desire demon who suggests a serial killer to take what they want from their victims; a fear demon who feeds the paranoia of a community into tearing itself apart in terror; these things and more are the plots of the demonic and their dark purpose can create truly horrific adventures for you heroes.

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The only thing to fear is Fear itself…

Fear demons serve better than most demons in the purpose of spooking their foes. Fear demons seek far more than a simple yelp or fright from their victims. Fear demons would see people take their own lives or the lives of others in fear. They would see the fearful weep and cry out for the Maker that will not hear them. They feed from your fears of the future, failure, inadequacy, that you are unworthy, or that you are a monster yourself. They command Terror demons, lesser of their kin who seek simple responses of fright, and use them to spread paranoia, doubt, and violence. They would not see that their targets die from fright, but continue their lives consumed by unease that something is amiss. This inevitably destroys communities but the Fear demon is patient and can find more to feast on.

Fear is quite plentiful in Thedas, and your worst nightmares know it…

Classical Monstrosities

More classical horrific creatures exist in Thedas so don’t hesitate to use them as you have seen them in their countless publications, movies, games, and art.

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The walking dead are plentiful particularly in Nevarra, where it is considered rude to the dead to burn their corpse. Instead they build elaborate tombs like the Grand Necropolis to bury their dead in their finery and with their greatest possessions. This unfortunately means that corpse possession is more common than in other parts of Thedas, but tombs can still draw old ghosts out of the stone in any nation. Dwarven mine shafts can collapse and have bitter dwarven apparitions rise from their bodies to haunt the living. Demons of all kinds possess corpses to walk in the waking world, creating monstrosities like Revenants and Arcane Horrors. Powerful Entropy-specialists can animate bones into small armies turned towards dark conquests. The dead have difficulty staying that way in Thedas, as the Maker’s first born are quite jealous of those who live.

werewolves.png

Werewolves are most common in Ferelden, but there’s no reason to say that one or two did not leave the Brecilian to seek new victims and spread the disease of lycanthropy. New packs could have started and spread werewolves to the far corners of Thedas, with slavering teeth ready to tear into the warm, wet flesh of men, dwarves, elves, or even qunari.

A_Maiden_in_Distress.png

Vampires also exist in Thedas, as the life-draining abominations created by hunger demons. Particularly powerful hunger demons could even take more humanoid forms to trick their prey into a moment of weakness that they may use to spring upon their soft necks. Hunger demons are quite rare, even in the Fade, and so should be used sparingly and to dramatic effect. A potent hunger demon could be possessing a living creature the PCs know, merely waiting to get them alone, or they could be the poor soul trapped in a crypt, drawing the PCs into an ambush against several possessed skeletons before feasting on their  bodies when they perish.

The Darkness of Humanity

The title is a bit humanocentric, as this can apply to any thinking race, but the darkness of humanity is a common theme in Thedas’ dark and troubled past. Investigations on the trails of serial killers can happen in more cosmopolitan settings. Mages can make particularly potent murderers, especially quiet ones who can conceal their powers. Demon cults and even Old God cults could serve as dark puppeteers, pulling strings that end lives. The possibilities in this category are as wide as the less-supernatural range of horror literature and Thedas can use this to great effect.

We hope this helps your adventures get a little more fearful! Be safe and happy spooking!

Episode 11: Call in the Stunt-Double!

Welcome to the Wonders of Thedas Podcast, your one-stop shop for all your Dragon Age RPG needs!

In this episode we explore the exciting Stunt system, and do a few back flips while we’re at it! We also discuss some Templar-Mage politics, archers with animal friends, and some expertly crafted custom content for PCs! We really rolled well on this one, so we hope you enjoy the show!

If you’d like to see Wired_Wolf’s Veil Codex, you can click here!

If you like to read DracoDruid’s Free Form Dragon Age document, you can click here!

As always, if you have a question about the Dragon Age RPG or have some custom Dragon Age content you’d like to share, please send your submissions to  wondersofthedaspodcast@gmail.com, or in a message to our Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, Google+, or Soundcloud accounts! You can also message Kot the Protector on the Green Ronin forums!

Thank you, again, for listening!